Home > blades, cisco, datacenter, Hardware refresh, UCS > Week One of Cisco UCS Implementation Complete

Week One of Cisco UCS Implementation Complete

The first week of Cisco UCS implementation has passed.  I wish I could say we were 100% successful, but I can’t.  We’ve encountered two sticking points which are requiring some rethinking on our part.

The first problem we have run into revolves around our SAN.  The firmware on our MDS switches is a bit out of date and we’ve encountered a display bug in the graphical SAN management tool (Fabric Manager).  This display bug won’t show our UCS components as “zoneable” addresses.  This means that all SAN configurations relating to UCS have to be done via command line.   Why don’t we update our SAN switch firmware?  That would also entail updating the firmware on our storage arrays and it is not something we are prepared to do right now.  It might end up occurring sooner rather than later if doing everything via command line is too cumbersome.

The second problem involves connecting to two separate L2 networks.  This has been discussed on various blogs such as BradHedlund.com and the Unified Computing Blog.  Suffice it to say that we have proven that UCS was not designed to directly connect to two different L2 networks at the same time.  While there is a forthcoming firmware update that will address this, it does not help us now.  I should clarify that this is not a bug and that UCS is working as designed.  I am going to guess that either Cisco engineers did not think that customers would want to connect in to two L2 networks or that it was just a future roadmap feature.  Either way, we are working on methods to get around the problem.

For those who didn’t click the links to the other blogs, here’s a short synopsis:  UCS basically treats all uplink ports equally.  It doesn’t know about the different networks so it will assume any VLAN can be on any uplink port.  ARPs, broadcasts, other terms and how they all work apply here.  If you want a better description, please go click the links in the previous paragraph.

But the entire week was not wasted and we managed to accomplish quite a bit.  Once we get passed the two hurdles mentioned above, we should be able to commence our testing.  It’s actually quite a bit of work to get this far.  Here’s how it pans out:

  1. Completed setup of policies
  2. Completed setup of Service Profile Templates
  3. Successfully deployed a number of different server types based on Service Profiles and Server Pool Policy Qualifications
  4. Configured our VM infrastructure to support Palo
  5. Configure UCS to support our VM infrastructure
  6. Successfully integrated UCS into our Windows Deployment system

Just getting past numbers 1 and 2 was a feat.  There are a number of policies that you can set so it is very easy to go overboard and create/modify way too many.   The more you create, the more you have to manage and we are trying to follow the K.I.S.S principle as much as possible.   We started out by having too many policies, but eventually came to our senses and whittled the number down.

One odd item to note: when creating vNIC templates, a corresponding port profile is created under the VM tab of UCS Manager.  Deleting vNIC templates does not delete the corresponding port profiles so you will have to manually delete them.  Consistency would be nice here.

And finally, now that we have a complete rack of UCS I can show you the just how “clean” the system looks.

Before

The cabling on a typical rack

After

A full rack of UCS - notice the clean cabling

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Let’s hope week number two gets us into testing mode…..

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  1. July 5, 2010 at 7:33 pm

    It’s worth noting that you can absolutely connect to disparate L2 domains today by using a combination of switch mode and pin groups. The future plans for UCS around supporting disjointed L2 domains has to do with supporting them in the default EHV mode.

    Nice summary, looking forward to seeing more of your experiences!

    • July 5, 2010 at 7:51 pm

      Quite correct, but then we lose the value of EHV.

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