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My Thoughts on Our Cisco UCS Sales Experience

This is a topic that when I think about it, I jump around in my head from subtopic to subtopic.  To make things easier on myself, I am going to write a bunch of disjointed paragraphs and tie them together in the end.

Disjoint #1

I’ve never worked on Cisco gear in the past.  Everywhere I worked where I had access to network/server equipment, Cisco was not a technology provider.  I don’t know why, other than I’ve heard Cisco had the priciest gear on the market.  I’ve also heard/read that while Cisco is #1 in the networking gear market, their products are not necessarily #1 in performance, capacity, etc.  Throw in the perception of the 800lb gorilla and you get a lot of negative commentary out there.

Disjoint #2

When I was 19, I started my career in the technology field as a bench tech for a local consumer electronics store.  The owner (Ralph) was a man wise beyond his years. He saw something in me and decided to take me under his wing, but because I was 19, I did not understand/appreciate the opportunity that he was bestowing upon me.

While I learned some of the various technical aspects of running a small business, I did not do so well on the human side of it.  I was a brash, cocky 19yr old who thought he could take over the world.  However, there is one thing Ralph said that I remember very well and that is, “If no one has any problems, how will they ever find out what wonderful customer service we have”.

It’s not that he wanted people to have problems with the equipment they purchased.  He knew that by selling thousands of answering machines, telephones, T.Vs, computer, etc there would be some issues at some point and he felt that he  should do his best to make amends for it.

Ralph truly believed in customer service and would go out of his way to ensure that all customers left feeling like they had been taken care of extremely well.  If there was poster child for exemplary customer service, it would be Ralph.

Disjoint #3

A number of vendors with broad product lines have somehow decided that the SMB market does not need robust, highly available (maybe even fault tolerant) equipment.  Somehow, company size and revenue have become equated with technical needs.  Perceptions of affordability have also played into this, meaning, if you can’t afford it, then you don’t need it.

Why do I bring this up?  Way back in one of my earlier posts, I mentioned that we had a major piece of equipment fail and received poor customer service from the vendor.  The vendor sales rep kept saying that we bought the wrong equipment.  We didn’t buy the wrong equipment, we bought what we could afford.   In hindsight it wasn’t the equipment that failed us, but the company behind it.

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Tieing all this together…

When we first started looking at UCS, some folks here had trepidations about doing business with Cisco.  There were preconceived notions of pricing and support.  Cisco was also perceived to have a reputation of abandoning a market where they could not be number one in sales.

I must also admit that there are technical zealots in my organization that only believe in technical specifications.  These folks try to avoid products that don’t “read” the best on paper or have the best results in every performance test.

However, my team diligently worked to overcome these objections one by one and we couldn’t have done it without the exceptional Cisco sales team assigned to us.

In the early part of the sales process, we pretty much only dealt with the Product Sales Specialist (PSS) and her System Engineer (SE).  The rest of the account team entered the picture a month or so later.

These two (PSS and SE) had the patience of Job.   The sales team took copious amounts of time meeting with us to explain how UCS was different from the other blade systems out there and how it could fit into our environment and enable us to achieve our strategic goals.  All questions were answered thoroughly in a timely manner.  Not once did I ever get the feeling that they (Cisco) felt they were wasting their time.

When the infamous HP-sponsored Tolly report (and other competing vendor FUD) came out, Cisco sales took the time to allay our concerns.   As we read and talked about other competing products, not once did they engage in any negative marketing.  Cisco took the high road and stuck to it.

We had phone calls with multiple reference accounts.  We had phone calls with product managers.  We had phone calls with the Unified Computing business unit leaders.   We had phone calls with…you get the idea.  Cisco put in a great amount of effort show us their commitment to be in the server business.

On top of all this, there was no overt pressure to close the sale.  Yes, the sales team asked if they could have the sale.  That’s what they are supposed to do.  But they didn’t act like car salesman by offering a limited duration, once in a lifetime deal.   Instead, they offered a competitive price with no strings attached. (Disjoint #1)

Needless to say, we bought into UCS and have transitioned to the post sales team.  This means we now interact more with our overall account rep and a generic SE rather than the PSS and her SE.  I call our new SE generic because he is not tied to a particular product but represents the entire Cisco product line.  He’s is quite knowledgeable and very helpful in teaching the ways of navigating Cisco sales and support.

So has everything gone perfectly?  No. We’ve had a few defective parts.  If you have read of my other posts, you know that we have had some integration issues.  We’ve also found a few areas of the management system that could use a bit more polish.  So in light of all this, do I regret going with UCS?  Not at all.  I still think it is the best blade system out there and I truly think the UCS architecture is the right way to go.

But with defective parts, integrations issues, etc…”Why do I still like Cisco?” you ask.  For starters, I don’t expect everything to be perfect.  That’s just life in the IT field.

Second, go re-read Disjoint #2.   Cisco must have hired Ralph at some point in time because their support has been phenomenal.    Not only do the pre and post sales teams check in to see how we are doing, any time we run into an issue they ask what Cisco can do to help.  It’s not that they just ask to see if they can help, they actually follow through if we say “yes”.  They are treating us as if we are their most important customer.

Finally, to tie in Disjoint #3, any time we run into something where other vendors would say we purchased the wrong equipment, Cisco owns the issue and asks how they can improve what we already have purchased.   It’s not about “buy this” or “buy that”.  It’s “How can we make it right?”, “What can we do to improve the product/process/experience?”, and “What could we have done differently?”   These are all questions a quality organization asks themselves and their customers.

I don’t know what else I can write about my Cisco sales experience other than to say that it has become my gold standard.  If other vendors read this post, they now know what standard they have to live up to.

To other UCS customers: What was your sale experience like?

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  1. August 31, 2010 at 11:24 pm

    Hey Adam, this is a cool post. It’s not often that customers take time out to say something positive about an 800lb gorilla like Cisco, but peel away the gorilla outfit and there’s lots of little people, like the people you identify, operating the levers.

    I’m sure the folks involved will be proud of what you’ve said and appreciate the candid words, so thank you for taking the time to do this.

    It’s very much appreciated.
    Steve

  2. Justin walther
    September 1, 2010 at 6:58 pm

    Thanks for the interesting post. I’m on the Cisco TAC team that supports UCS. It’s always nice to hear we’re doing a good job for our customers. We really do care and also really do love UCS.

    –Justin W.

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