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Book Review: IPv6 for Enterprise Networks

April 27, 2011 Leave a comment

I just finished reading “IPv6 for Enterprise Networks”, published by Cisco Press.   All I can say is that unless you have the hots for IP protocol discussions, this book will not rock your world.   It’s not that it is a poorly written book, it’s just that I don’t find IPv6 to be exciting.   That being said, the authors do a very good job in covering the material.

As is typical of tech books, we start with the obligatory history lesson.  Why should we transition to IPv6?  Simple, we are running out of IPv4 addresses.  Lesson over.  There is more to it in the book, but let’s be real here:  The largest driver is the lack of IPv4 addresses.

With that chapter out of the way, the book covers the basics of network design.  This is a chapter that appears in a number of Cisco Press books.  It’s a good reinforcement of network design principles that we should all do well to remember.

Now that two basic chapters are out of the way, the authors delve into IPv6 itself, how it is different from IPv4, and how to get from here to there.  This is where the book shines.  It’s a great reference for making the transition from IPv4 to IPv6.

As part of making the transition, the authors discuss the pros/cons of many of the various migration strategies such as running a dual protocol stack, running a hybrid network, and more as they relate to the different types of networks (campus, branch, data center, and so on).  It should be noted that each network type has its own chapter.  There is simply too much information that the readers need to be aware of that it would be a disservice to cover them together.

The authors simply could have ended the book there, but that would have made for incomplete book in my opinion.  Thankfully, they kept going and included a chapter on managing an IPv6 network.  While much remains the same, there are differences that may arise that readers should be aware of.  In some cases, it’s just how to enable the monitoring/reporting capabilities of the equipment.  In other cases, IPv6 just handles things differently.

As with most Cisco books, there are plenty of screen shots, command lines, and such given that the reader should be able to copy from to get from point A to point B.  I like this.  Far too many books out there have too few examples.

The last item covered turns out to be my favorite: setting up a lab.  While it is not a monkey script type of chapter (type this, click this) it still gives the reader enough detailed information to be successful.  Personally, I think that if you need a monkey script, then maybe this is one area where you shouldn’t be working.  What really surprised me in this chapter was the inclusion of screenshots from an ESXi host showing how to configure it for IPv6.  Talk about timely and relevant.

Would I recommend this book?  Yes.  While not exactly a page turner for most people (again, we are talking IPv6 here), it is a very good reference guide for making the transition from IPv4 to IPv6.