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Posts Tagged ‘Virtual Center’

Does ESX lack storage resiliency?

October 27, 2010 3 comments

Back in April, I posted about how our primary storage vendor disavowed us after one of our arrays failed by saying, “It’s not our problem”.  (You can read about it here).  Well, this same vendor had to do some “routine” maintenance on one of our arrays that was so “routine” that the vendor claimed it would not have any impact on our servers.  The vendor technician came onsite to do the work and reaffirmed that it should have no visible impact.   This routine maintenance was just a reboot of one controller, wait for it come back online, and then a reboot of the other.  Over 50 servers went down and it took us three hours to recover.

While I could go on and rant about the vendor, I really want to focus on something I noticed about the outage.  Almost all of our physical Windows servers tolerated the outage and suffered no major problems, but our ESX hosts are another story altogether.

All of our ESX hosts that were attached to the array in question basically “froze”.  It was really weird.  Virtual Center said all the virtual servers were up and running, but we couldn’t do anything with them.  Rebooted VC, no change.    I logged into the service consoles of the hosts to run various iterations of vmware-cmd to manipulate the virtual servers, but nothing worked.   I figured the only thing I could do at this point was to reboot the hosts.  Since my hosts are attached to multiple arrays, I tried to vMotion the known good virtual servers to a single host so I wouldn’t have to take them down.  No go.  Basically, I had lost all control of my hosts.

OK, time for a reboot.  Did that and I lost all access to my LUNs.  A quick looksie into UCSM showed all my connections were up.  So did Fabric Manager.   I could see during the reboots that ESX was complaining about not being able to read a label for a volume or two.  Reviewing various host log files showed a number of weird entries that I have no idea how to interpret.  Many were obviously disk related, others weren’t.

After multiple reboots, HBA rescans (initiated via VC and service console), and such we still couldn’t see the LUNs.  Keep in mind; we were three hours into a major outage.  That is the point where I have to get real creative in coming up with solutions.  I am not going to say that these solutions are ideal, but they will get us up and running.  In this case, I was thinking to repurpose our dev ESX hosts to our production environment.  All it would take would be to add them to the appropriate cluster, present LUNs, manually register any really messed up virtual servers, and power up the virtual servers.

Before I presented this idea to management, I don’t know what or why, but something triggered a memory of my first ESX host failure.   Way back in the ESX 2.x days, I had a problem where a patch took out access to my LUNs.  The fix was to run the command ‘esxcfg-boot –b’.   Ran it, problem fixed.

I know that the esxcfg-boot command rejiggers inits and such, but I really don’t know why it fixed the problem.  Did something happen to my HBA drivers/config?

What really bothers me about this is that almost all of my Windows servers and clusters came back online by themselves.  If they can do it, why can’t VMware program a bit more resiliency into ESX?  I hate say this, but incidents like this make me question my choice of hypervisor.  Since the latest version of Hyper-V relies on Windows Failover Clustering, would it have responded like my existing clusters and tolerated the outage appropriately?  Anyone know?

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Our Current UCS/vSphere Migration Status

August 17, 2010 Leave a comment

We’ve migrated most of our virtual servers over to UCS and vSphere.  I’d say we are about 85% done, with this phase being completed by Aug 29.  It’s not that it’s taking 10+ days to actually do the rest of the migrations.  It’s more of a scheduling issue.  From my perspective, I have three more downtimes to go.  Not much at all.

The whole process of migrating from ESX to vSphere and updating all the virtual servers has been interesting to say the least.  We haven’t encountered any major problems; just some small items related to the VMtools/VMhardware version (4 to 7) upgrades.   For example, our basic VMTools upgrade process is to right-click on a guest in the VIC and click on the appropriate items to perform an automatic upgrade.  When it works, the guest installs VMTools, reboots,  and comes back up without admin intervention.  For some reason, this would not work for our MS Terminal Servers unless we were logged into the target terminal server.

Here’s another example, this time involving Windows Server 2008:  The automatic upgrade process wouldn’t work either.  Instead, we had to login and launch VMTools from the System Tray and select upgrade.  The only operating system that went perfectly was Windows Server 2003 with no fancy extras (terminal services, etc).  Luckily, that’s the o/s most of our virtual workloads are running.  I am going to hazard a guess and say that some of these oddities are related to our various security settings, GPOs, and the like.

All-in-all, the vm migration has gone very smoothly.  I must say that I am happy with the quality of the VMware hyerpvisor, Virtual Center, and other basic components.  There has been plenty of opportunity for something to go extremely wrong, but so far, nada. (knock on wood)

So what’s next?  We are preparing to migrate our SQL servers onto bare metal blades.  In reality, we are building new servers from scratch and installing SQL server.  The implementation of UCS has given us the opportunity to update our SQL servers to Windows Server 2008 and SQL Server 2008.   Other planned moved include some Oracle app servers (on RedHat) as well as domain controllers, file share clusters, and maybe some tape backup servers.  This should take us into September.

Once we finish with the blades, we’ll start deploying the Cisco C-series rackmount servers.  We still have a number of instances where we have to go rackmount.   Servers in this category typically need multiple NICs, telephony boards, or other specialized expansion boards.

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Upgrade Follies

August 12, 2010 Leave a comment

It’s amazing how many misconfigured, or perceived misconfigured, items can show up when doing maintenance and/or upgrades.  In the past three weeks, we have found at least four production items that fit this description that no one noticed because things appeared to be working.  Here’s a sampling:

During our migration from our legacy vm host hardware to UCS, we broke a website that was hardware load-balanced across two different servers.  Traffic should have been directed to Server A, then Server B, then Server C.  After the migration traffic was only going to Server C, which just hosts a page that says the site is down.  It’s a “maintenance” server, meaning that whenever we take a public facing page down, the traffic gets directed to Server C so that people can see a nice screen that says, “Sorry down for maintenance …..”

Everything looked right in the load balancer configuration.  While delving deeper, we noticed that server A was configured to be the primary node for a few other websites.  An application analyst whose app was affected chimed in and said that the configuration was incorrect.  Website 1 traffic was to go first to Server A, then B.  Website 2 traffic was supposed to go in the opposite order.   All our application documentation agreed with the analyst.  Of course, he wrote the documentation so it better agree with him 🙂  Here is the disconnect: we track all our changes in a Change Management system and no one ever put the desired configuration change into the system.  As far as our network team is concerned; the load balancer is configured properly.  Now this isn’t really a folly since our production system/network matched what our change management and CMDB systems were telling us.  This is actually GOODNESS.  If we ever had to recover due to a disaster, we would reference our CMDB and change management systems so they had better be in agreement.

Here’s another example:  We did a mail server upgrade about six months ago and everything worked as far as we could tell.  What we didn’t know was that some things were not working but no one noticed because mail was getting through.  When we did notice something not correct (a remote monitoring system) and fixed the cause, it led us to another item, and so on and so on.  Now, not everything was broken at the same time.  In a few cases, the fix of one item actually broke something else.  What’s funny is that if we didn’t correct the monitoring issue, everything would have still worked.  It was a fix that caused all the other problems.  In other words, one misconfiguration proved to be a correct configuration for other misconfigured items.  In this case, multiple wrongs did make a right.  Go Figure.

My manager has a saying for this: “If you are going to miss, miss by enough”.

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I’ve also noticed that I sometimes don’t understand concepts when I think I do.  As part of our migration to UCS, we are also upgrading from ESX3.5 to vSphere.   Since I am new to vSphere, I did pretty much what every SysAdmin does: click all the buttons/links.  One of those buttons is the “Advanced Runtime Info” link that is part of the VMware HA portion of the main Virtual Center screen.

This link brings up info on slot sizes and usage.  You would think that numbers would add up, but clearly they don’t.

How does 268 -12 = 122?  I’m either obviously math challenged or I really need to go back and re-read the concept of Slots.

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